Tuesday’s Tips…Laundry

laudry with sun shining

Hello Dear Friends,

I pray each of you had a lovely day in the Lord!!

Mine was filled with Algebra, writing and low and behold…a little rest!! PTL!!

I also made some pesto from scratch…regular and casein free that I will serve with a nice salad over quinoa pasta!! YUM!

As I have prayed through what I wanted to do with this fun Tuesday’s Tips…I felt the Lord lead in finding wonderful tips for laundry!!

Our sweet oldest daughter was the one who did all laundry for years. FYI: each person in our home and on the property has assigned chores and duties. She liked this job until college and work became too busy. So my two youngest and I have taken it over. We are all happy with the new duties. But as I have taken it over I have seen some issues I am remedying. ūüôā Some stains that need addressing, some severe wrinkles that seem permanent after so long and lots and lots of bleach damage.

So  here is some good information I have researched online.

I pray you are blessed!! ūüėČ

Now back to my Chicken Pesto Pasta and salad!! ūüėČ YUM! ūüėČ

Enjoy!

k xoxo

Dealing with Bleach Damage

by Charlotte Wood (last updated February 20, 2009)

Early in my childhood I learned that when I clean the bathroom I need to wear clothes that I can afford to ruin with bleach. Sometimes you think you can be super careful and all will be well, but then fifteen minutes later you notice that tiny, but conspicuous bleach spot right in the middle of your jeans. Blast.

Like with most severe stains, it’s way easier to prevent the stain than to remove it. When dealing with bleach products, make sure either your clothes are¬†covered¬†up or you’re wearing clothes you don’t really care about. The thing about bleach is that it’s permanent and so removing it is difficult if not impossible.

Whenever you’re dealing with products that contain bleach, use¬†rubber¬†gloves that cover the lower part of your sleeves. You’ll also notice that when you wear rubber gloves you usually are more careful when touching other things, such as your pants. So rubber gloves can be a good reminder to be cautious with the clothes you’re wearing.

Alas, it’s practically impossible to remove bleach stains once you have them. You’ll have to work with what you’ve got once you’ve bleached your clothes. If the stain is small you could probably get away with it and hope that no one really notices. (Use those pants for more casual things and it won’t really make a difference). You could do some patchwork magic if that’s your style, or just chuck the clothes into the cleaning and¬†painting¬†clothes bin.

While removing bleach stains isn’t really possible, you should focus your clothes-preserving efforts on preventing the stain in the first place. This part really isn’t so hard and will yield satisfying results when you can put on a pair of jeans and say “Hey I have a clean bathroom¬†and¬†bleach free pants!”

Dealing with Laundry Scorch Marks

by Lee Wyatt (last updated September 13, 2010)

There is a difference between a light scorch mark and a heavy one. A light scorch mark that is found on your laundry is most often the result of not paying particular attention when ironing your clothes. Dealing with laundry scorch marks such as these are fairly easy things to do. Unfortunately, dealing with the occasional heavy scorch marks (otherwise known as full on burns) isn’t as easy a task. Simply use the steps below to get rid of the lighter marks, and have your clothes looking good once again.

Before starting this method though, a brief word of warning. Since you will be using some chemicals such as ammonia, or hydrogen peroxide, you need to be very careful. If you use this on heavily colored clothing, you may end up bleaching the¬†colors¬†out. Always test the¬†cleaners¬†on an area of the clothing that isn’t easily seen so you can see if there will be any adverse reactions. Be sure that you test your¬†cleaning¬†solution¬†on all your clothing, regardless of coloring, since the bleach and hydrogen peroxide can damage the fibers in the cloth.

  1. Apply the chemicals.¬†You only want to use a small amount of hydrogen peroxide and ammonia when dealing with scorch marks. The best way to make sure that you don’t over do it is by applying the chemicals with an eye dropper. Begin by applying the hydrogen peroxide to the scorch mark. After you have done that, rinse out the eye dropper, and then apply a drop or two of ammonia to the scorched area.
  2. Let it stand. Allow the chemicals to stand for several minutes. The minimum amount of time that you should let them stand is three or four minutes, but you can let them stand for up to an hour. Do not let the chemicals dry out though. Periodically, reapply some more hydrogen peroxide and ammonia with the eye dropper.
  3. Flush it. Flush the stained area with some cool water. Completely saturate the stain so that you can be sure that you have completely removed the chemicals that you placed on the clothing.
  4. Launder your clothes. Once you have finished flushing the clothes, you can launder your clothes as you normally would, with only one slight change. Use an oxygenated bleach, such as Oxyclean, when you wash the clothes. Keep in mind that you only want to use this type of bleach if it is safe for the clothes.

Tips credit: Cleaning.tips.net

Picture credit: Pictures.com

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